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Raymond, Harold "Tubby"


The former Northern High athlete became one of college football's greatest coaches at the University of Delaware for 18 years. In that span, his teams won three NCAA Division 2 championships and more than 150 games.




Football career

Raymond, a native of Flint, MI, was a quarterback and linebacker at the University of Michigan. At Michigan, he played for the legendary Fritz Crisler. While playing for Crisler, Raymond learned the Single-Wing offense. He later became a legendary innovator of the famous Wing-T offense while at the University of Delaware following fellow college football Hall of Fame inductee David M. Nelson an original mastermind of the Wing-T offense. He first began his career at Delaware as backfield coach under Nelson (also ex-Michigan) from 1954-1966. Raymond retired as Head Coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens after 36 seasons with a 300-119-3 record, three national titles (1971, 1972, 1979), 14 Lambert Cup trophies, 23 post-season bids and four consecutive victories in the Boardwalk Bowl. After classifications were formed in the early 1970s, Delaware was a Division II program until elevating to Division I-AA in 1981. He tallied more than half of all-time Blue Hen victories in the 110-year-old program at the time of his retirement. Tubby Raymond Field was dedicated at Delaware Stadium (built in 1952) in his honor on Aug. 29, 2002.

Former Division III Rowan head coach (1993-2001) and Blue Hen linebacker (1978-1981) K. C. Keeler officially replaced Raymond on March 5, 2002.

300th Win

Going into the 2001 season, Raymond needed just four wins to reach the 300 mark. At the first game of the season, a banner hung above the stadium listing the numbers 297, 298, 299 and 300. As each win was accomplished, the respective number was crossed off.

Raymond's 300th win came during the last home game of the season on Nov. 10, with a 10-6 victory against the University of Richmond Spiders. As the clock wound down in the game, the crowd began chanting "Tubby, Tubby". Raymond made a short, humble speech and was carried off the field by his team as a construction worker climbed aboard a cherry-picker truck to cross off the final number on the poster.

The following is an excerpt from Tubby Raymond's speech to the exalting Delaware faithful after his 300th victory.

"I have to apologize for paraphrasing, but I feel a little bit like Lou Gehrig. I'm the luckiest man on the face of the earth. First, I'd like to thank the Delaware fans who have been here for so many years. I know there are things that happen that you don't like. There are things that happen that I don't like. But the thing that's there all the time is you. You're at every football game. You're excited about being here, and you truly made Delaware football something we can all be proud of. Thank you very much."

Delaware lost its final game of the season on the road against Villanova, and that winter, Raymond announced his retirement, ending his career at an even 300 wins.

Quotes

"Football puts a premium on loyalty, dedication and sacrifice, which are characteristics that aid a player on the field and for the rest of his life." (circa 1998)

"Run em!" (the infamous command he gave before "gassers" each practice)

"Give me 7 of 'em!" (the dreaded line yelled out every day of pre-season camp indicating it was time for mixed agilities)

"People pay for weather like this!" (Referring to the hot and dry late August Delaware weather, Tub would often say this during summer camp) "Rack em"